Water Towers of the South

Water Towers of the South

As I travel around the southeastern United States with my cameras I find it interesting to check out and photograph unusual municipal (and other) water towers. These fixtures’ designs often have a lot to say about the town where they are located.

Here are a few of those that I find most artistic and interesting.

I’ll start off with one that is most unique! Gaffney, South Carolina is less than 200 miles from the Georgia line. Gaffney takes much pride in their locally grown peaches and I think this is their signal to Georgians that they feel Gaffney peaches are superior.

Gaffney’s World Famous “Peachoid”

The “Peachoid” water tank is located in Gaffney, South Carolina on Interstate 85, and can be seen for miles.

Another favorite is right here in Florida in the town of Plant City. Plant City claims to be the Winter Strawberry Capital of the World and celebrates with an annual festival. The municipal water tower is a bulbous design painted to resemble a huge strawberry. Interestingly, Plant City was not named for its strawberry plants. The city was named after prominent railroad developer Henry B. Plant.

Folkston, Georgia, “Gateway To the Okefenokee” water tower, celebrates their famous nearby swamp.

Not far away from Folkston is Waycross, Georgia, that also borders the Okefenokee swamp. Pogo Possum, born in 1943 from the imagination of Walt Kelly welcomes visitors to Waycross. In 1987, Selby Kelly granted the City of Waycross permission to adopt Pogo as it’s goodwill ambassador.

Wilson, North Carolina’s water tower is an attractive addition to their skyline.

Zebulon North Carolina Water Tower, towers over Five County Stadium, Zebulon, North Carolina, home of the Carolina Mud Cats, Carolina League affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers. (“Mudcats” is Southern slang for catfish.)

Lakeland, Florida, is the home of Publix Supermarkets. Publix supermarkets do a lot of the preparation of their products that are delivered to their stores throughout the southeast in their facilities in Lakeland, Florida. This water tower designed to look like a birthday cake sits across the highway from their baked-goods factory in Lakeland. I’ve heard that the cake’s candles are lighted after dark. However, I haven’t been nearby at night.

Lucky Strike Water Tower is erected above the American Tobacco District, Durham, North Carolina. The district is now an entertainment center.

NEW Addition:

I finally got a few minutes to stop by my hometown since 1970’s water tower to shoot a couple of photos of it. Here is one-

Jacksonville Beach (Jax Beach,) Florida Water Tower. Note the letter ‘A’ in the shape of a lifeguard chair.

I have more of my water-tank photos on MY PHOTO SITE.

I’d love it if you took a look!

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“Shoeless Joe” Jackson House

“Shoeless Joe Jackson” Historical Marker outside his former house that is now a museum.

“Shoeless Joe Jackson House”

As lifelong Boston Red Sox baseball fans, Helen and I were excited to go to Greenville, South Carolina, to attend a baseball game at Fluor Field, “Little Fenway Park of the South.” When Greenville became the new home of Red Sox Class ‘A’ affiliate, the “Greenville Drive,” they rebuilt their baseball park to resemble Boston’s Fenway Park.

We went there in 2006 and I wrote about our visit in my earlier post.

“Shoeless Joe” Jackson House, built in 1940, was the last home of “Shoeless Joe” Jackson (1888-1951) one of the greatest natural hitters in the history of baseball. The house currently sits just outside of Fluor Field, Greenville, SC, home of the Greenville Drive (Boston Red Sox Class ‘A’ affiliate)

I went back to Greenville in 2011 and visited the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum which sits across the street from Fluor Field and shot this photo. The building, which is now the museum, was Joe and Katie’s final home. When they lived there, it was located at 119 E. Wilburn Avenue in Greenville and was later moved to the location across from the ballpark.

A couple of days ago, I was surprised to receive an email from the museum. Apparently, I had included my email address in the visitor log while I was there about nine years ago. Interestingly, they have moved the house again, (but this time only about 100 yards) and are expanding the building to make more room for its contents. The letter mentioned

"The street address became 356 Field Street, which was chosen as a way to honor Joe’s .356 career batting average, the third- highest in baseball history."
Two weeks ago, on Friday, July 31, our museum was moved. Like, the whole building. As you may or may not know, the building that has been our museum since we opened was the actual house Joe and Katie Jackson lived in for over a decade. In 1941, they bought the brick home at 119 E. Wilburn Avenue in Greenville, South Carolina. They lived out the rest of their days in that home, with Joe passing away in 1951, and Katie in 1959.

© 2020 Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum and Baseball Library Unsubscribe P.O. Box 4755, Greenville, SC 29608

If you are a baseball fan and are ever in the Greenville area of “upstate” South Carolina, I think you would enjoy a visit. You can find more info on their website HERE. I know I will be going back soon!

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